Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking

Are you planning to buy the best snowshoes for women and stride across the snowy fields? We researched precisely that, to provide all the knowledge you need. Snowshoes’ technology evolved mainly through the years, and now you can walk on snow safely and faster. Our article explains the factors in selecting the proper snowshoes and five suggestions on researched ideas.

Finding the best snowshoes for women involves looking for details like their traction and bindings, how lightweight they should be, and how easy it is to put them on and use them. Snowshoes for women are different than those for men, and there are reasons for that.

You want durable and comfortable snowshoes, as they occupy far more space around your feet and a different way of walking.

Some say it is like walking with flippers, but that is not true. Let us help you find out.

Comparison: Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking

IMAGE PRODUCT
Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 1Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 2 1. Odoland 4-in-1 Snowshoes for Women
  • Aluminum frame
  • Ratchet buckle binding
  • Νο Heel lift
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Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 3Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 4 2. Tubbs Women’s Flex RDG Snowshoe
  • Plastic frame
  • Steel traction rails
  • With Heel lift
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Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 5Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 6 3. Warmwithann Snowshoes for Women
  • Aluminum frame
  • Many lengths
  • With Heel lift
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Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 7Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 8 4. Yukon Charlie’s Advanced Float Women’s Snowshoe
  • Aluminum frame
  • V-tail
  • No Heel lift
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Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 9Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 10 5. ALPS Snowshoes for Women
  • Aluminum frame
  • Buckle
  • No Heel lift
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Thorough Reviews for Best Snowshoes For Women

Let’s get through the minute details of each snowshoe pair for women we researched here.

1. Odoland 4-in-1 Snowshoes for Women

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The Odoland 4-in-1 Snowshoes come with a 6000-grade durable Aluminum frame, rugged grip sawtooth crampons, and an easily adjustable binding system.

On top of these, the set includes poles, a carry bag, and gaiters. Thus the 4-in-1 concept.

The women’s snowshoe’s weight is in the low end, while they come in 3 different lengths.

Specifications

Weight3.4lbs-4lbs
Lengths 21″, 25″, 30″
Heel liftNo
Max weight120lb., 160lb., 250lb.

Features

  • Excellent traction
  • Bindings fit a wide variety of boots
  • Lightweight
  • Easily adjustable binding
  • Easy to use
  • Durable
  • Comfortable

What We Like

We love the set offer. It has all you need for snowshoeing, even trekking poles.

What We Don’t Like

It would be ideal if side crampons were included. The snowshoes are not suitable for all terrains, or at least for variable landscapes.

Pros

  • Great price for the set.
  • Nice fit.
  • Easy to carry and store.

Cons

  • Not for all terrains
  • Very few claim that clamps loosen up.

2. Tubbs Women’s Flex RDG Snowshoe 2021

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The Tubbs Women’s Flex RDG Snowshoe uses the BOA binding, which covers all kinds of footwear used with the snowshoe. The one-size RDGs are best for light hikers and compact snow terrains. However, BOA is not easy to clean when snow gathers around the reel compared to non-BOA bindings.

It is lightweight, and the traction bars provide the extra gripping needed on ice surfaces—the same stands when moving sidehill. You will notice the difference when you don’t simply want to float but “bite” the snow.

Due to its small deck, striding seems more comfortable in hard or crusty snow, but that is the opposite on powder snow.

Specifications

Weight3.5lbs
Lengths 22″
Heel liftYes
Max weight80-150 lbs

Features

  • Excellent traction
  • Bindings fit a wide variety of boots
  • All-terrain traction
  • Lightweight
  • Easily adjustable binding
  • Easy to use
  • Durable
  • Comfortable

What We Like

This is an excellent product with fantastic traction due to traction trails tech. The BOA binding is a good solution for all who don’t want straps and wires.

What We Don’t Like

They are not the ideal solution for powder snow unless you are and travel light. BOA tech may be fast, but since it is a rotating mechanism, it may form ice in very low temperatures.

Pros

  • Excellent for ice/crusty snow.
  • BOA binding fits a wide variety of boots.
  • Excellent traction and heel lift.

Cons

  • Not performing well on powder snow.
  • BOA may get icey at low temperatures.

3. Warmwithann Snowshoes for Women

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The Warmwithann Snowshoes are highly durable and built for all-terrain purposes. They have a fast pull binding system, so you can quickly come in and out. When you find steep uphills, you have heel lifters to help ease your walking.

The frame is made from aluminum, while the back is slightly rounded and upturn, which helps with soft snow. Crampons and front are made from steel for extra traction.

They come in a set with trekking poles, basket ends, and a carrying bag, weighing around 7 pounds.

Specifications

Weight3.5lbs
Lengths21″, 25″, 27″, 30″
Heel liftYes
Max weight180lb., 220lb., 260lb.

Features

  • Excellent traction
  • Bindings fit a wide variety of boots
  • Lightweight
  • Easily adjustable binding
  • Easy to use
  • Durable
  • Comfortable

What We Like

We liked that they come in sizes that include kids. As such, the whole family can get their pair. Great idea to have the poles included. The cold-resistant TPU binding with the large electroplated front and rear steel grip crampons offer additional traction on icier surfaces.

What We Don’t Like

Extra traction for icier surfaces doesn’t make them suitable for variable terrains. They remain ideal for mild trail conditions, just a bit more non-slippery.

Pros

  • Suitable for kids’ sizes.
  • Polls included.

Cons

  • Not for all variable terrains.

4. Yukon Charlie’s Advanced Float Women’s Snowshoe

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The Yukon Charlie’s Advanced Float Women’s Snowshoe is also made from a 6000-grade aluminum frame. The binding is a buckle easy pull “Fast-Fit.” You can get in and out fast with one pull of the strap.

This snowshoe is suitable for weights from 100 to 150 pounds, and its colors are vivid.

The v-shape tail allows for more natural movement. YC claims the snowshoes are suitable for either a slow stride or an aerobic sprint (running or jogging), but we didn’t run with them.

Specifications

Weight4.5lbs
Lengths21″
Heel liftNo
Max weight100-150 lbs

Features

  • Bindings fit a wide variety of boots
  • Lightweight
  • Easily adjustable binding
  • Easy to use
  • Durable
  • Comfortable

What We Like

We like that they are lightweight and fast to fit. They are a simple solution for beginners on trail walking.

What We Don’t Like

There is no rear grip crampon. That is necessary.

Pros

  • Fast to fit.
  • Good for beginners.

Cons

  • No rear grip crampon.

5. ALPS Snowshoes for Women

Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 19Best Snowshoes For Women For Winter Hiking 10

The ALPS Snowshoes for Women are suitable for trail terrains and easy hiking. The frame is made of durable, lightweight 6000 Series aircraft Aluminum, and the crampons are also made from Aluminum alloy. The deck is made from polyethylene.

Use them primarily for recreational snowshoeing on easy terrains. As you see from the size range, they are available for children too.

An affordable solution for beginners, that also comes as a set with trekking poles and a carry bag.

Specifications

Weight5.4lbs
Lengths14″, 17″, 19″, 21″, 25″, 27″, 30″
Heel liftNo
Max weight80lb. to 160lb.

Features

  • Bindings fit a wide variety of boots
  • Lightweight
  • Easily adjustable binding
  • Easy to use
  • Durable
  • Comfortable

What We Like

We like that they are lightweight and come with a family range of lengths. This model has two grips (front and back of the foot). They are suitable for beginners on easy trail walking and are easy to wear as the binding is similar to snowboard binding.

What We Don’t Like

Straps seem not to keep the boot in place in all cases, especially near the heel, unless your feet and boot are big. Snow tends to concentrate under the foot in hard snow terrains.

Pros

  • For beginners.
  • Simple, easy-to-use binding.

Cons

  • Binding strap lengths.

Our Choice of Best Snowshoes for Women

So much data to know when to choose snowshoes. Our research concluded that the ideal snowshoes are the Odoland 4-in-1 Snowshoes. They are suitable for not tricky terrains.

Not only do they provide the best set of extras on top of the snowshoes (poles, gaiters, tote bag), but they are a great choice due to:

  • Excellent traction.
  • Bindings that fit a wide variety of boots.
  • Easily adjustable binding.
  • Durable materials.

All that makes them ideal for comfortable snow walks and fun, and that is what most want from their snowshoeing experiences.

Questions To Consider Before Buying the Best Snowshoes for Women

Here are three critical questions to ask yourself before buying snowshoes for winter hiking.

What Kind of Snow do you Expect?

Hard and heavy or powder-like? When snow is powder-like, you need the flotation tails; otherwise, you will feel sinking in the snow. With wet and heavy snow, flotation tails are unnecessary (but reasonable to carry as conditions may change).

How Heavy are you, and do you Carry a Pack?

The equation is simple here. The bigger or heavier you are, the more snowshoe surface you need to avoid sinking. Weight is the sum of your body weight, backpack, and any extra gear you may carry. Snowshoes come with an indicator named max-weight. That is the maximum weight under which they perform best. You don’t want to sink in the snow. It is exhausting and dangerous.

What do the Numbers Mean for Snowshoes?

You see a series of numbers when you want to buy the best and proper snowshoes. These are the following.

Snowshoes Length: i.e., 21″, is the size from one end to another. Most snowshoes are around 8″ wide. So that is the surface they cover. Notice that sizes change along with the max-weight they are suitable for. For example, a 22″ pair may have a 180lbs limit, a 25″ pair may have a 210lbs limit, and so on.

Snowshoes Weight: How much they weigh (usually around 3 to 5lbs).

Snowshoes max-weight: The total weight they can carry (body, gear, etc.). Accordingly, sizes come in wide ranges (i.e., 80lbs-120lbs).

There is an extra indicator that is called “Heel Lift.” That is a “yes” or “no.” Heel lift adds 2 inches of a platform under your heel and makes walking easier without straining your calf muscle.

What Kind of Terrain do You Plan to Walk with Snowshoes for Women?

There are cases where the selection of snowshoes changes if the terrain is either flat terrain and trail walking, steep and mountainous terrain, or rolling variable terrain.

Flat Terrain: Most beginner snowshoes are suitable for that type. Flat means simple trail paths with few inclinations.

Rolling / Variable Terrain: If you plan to hike outside the standard trail paths, that is the variable terrain, as it alters. Possibly this is the best option to choose for most of your winter hiking on snow. It would help if you had snowshoes with better grip with semi-aggressive crampons.

Steep and Mountainous Terrain: Choose a pair of snowshoes with a heel lift and excellent grip. They perform well on icy slopes too.

What Are The Differences Between Men’s and Women’s Snowshoes?

Despite what you may think, not all snowshoes are unisex. There are three main differences between snowshoes for women: the following.

  1. Size: Women’s snowshoes come in smaller sizes than men’s ones.
  2. Shape: They have narrower frames and tapered ends to follow a stride compatible with many women.
  3. Weight: Smaller size results in a lighter pair of snowshoes.

An extra thing you will notice in women’s snowshoes is color. Manufacturers tend to apply pigments that they think women may like better (i.e., pink, yellow, light green, purple, etc.). You can say that that is a gender difference concept, but on the other hand, they may look better to some eyes.

The materials used in snowshoes are the same for either men or women. They usually are carbon, steel, aluminum, or hardened plastic.

How to Choose Snowshoes For Women

Here are the factors that will help you identify the best snowshoes option for your needs. This information influences your decision and can differentiate between the best and worst choices.

Sizing

Consider the maximum load on your snowshoes (body weight and gear) and the terrain type. You will notice that indicator on each snowshoes pair and for which terrain they perform best.

How to calculate correctly? If you plan for day trips only, add approximately 20-30 pounds to your body weight. Add the gear weight you plan to carry for variable terrains or multi-day trips. That includes food, clothing, sleeping gear, etc. Your backpack has its weight too.

The next thing to consider is length; terrain has a word in it. You move faster on flat terrains with a shorter snowshoe, but with longer ones, you move better on powder-like snow. However, longer ones need more effort to move on steep topography, and you have something more significant to lift and walk.

So, consider the circumstances and choose accordingly.

Consider if there is a need for snowshoe tails. These extensions to the back of your snowshoe give more flotation and surface area. If you are unsure about the terrain conditions on a trip, the best is to carry a pair.

Bindings

Snowshoe binding should keep the snowshoe tight in place. It must be easy to get in and out while using gloves; otherwise, it will cause trouble. Two binding systems are rotating and hinged, allowing your snowshoe to move separately from the frame.

The Floating Binding: Allow for better feet range of movement and fast on the frame. The snowshoe tail lifts on each step. That flings snow on the back of your legs as you walk.

The Hinged Binding: They are fastened on the deck of the snowshoe. The only downturn is that they are not very flexible when moving backward on the trail.

The materials for strapping your boot on the snowshoe are usually made from rubber, nylon, or cable lace. The binding pattern is either with ratchet straps, pull webbing, straight straps, or the B.O.A system. BOA is used in many shoe types, beyond snowshoes. It allows a secure fit and makes it easy to get in and out of your snowshoes.

Traction & Heel Risers

The traction type varies depending on the terrain you plan to walk. The logic and application are the same as the crampons for mountaineering boots. All others have such, excluding running snowshoes (a category by themselves).

The regular traction (front and back of the snowshoe) on flat terrains without variations is acceptable. If you think you will have to traverse (that means more difficult terrains) in your trip, then side traction is essential.

In the same way, heel lifts or heel raisers (it is the same) are essential when going uphill. It’s pure physiology mechanics. Straining your calf that is strapped flat on the snowshoe will cause injuries. When going uphill, you need the heel part lifted to avoid strain.

Poles

Do not leave your home without a good pair of hiking poles. On snow (hard or soft), you must wear the basket part to your poles. That is the round piece above the spike.

Note that ski poles usually have different basket sizes (more significant) than those in trekking poles. Seek separate poles or buy a pair of baskets to switch on your regular trekking pole.

Poles provide stability and good smooth movement. Without them, you get exhausted.

Grip

As you walk, you grip the snow. The grip is the “toothy-like” part in the front of your boot and under the snowshoe; without that is like almost sliding on snow.

You won’t notice a big difference on flat terrains (unless you encounter ice), but when moving even slightly uphill, you will—moving forward or backward works with moving your feet and grip.

What Shoes Do You Wear With Snowshoes?

The general rule is that you need good hiking boots to keep your feet dry and warm while making it easy to move. With that in mind, boots like Alpinism boots are usually not the case.

Winter boots, on the other hand, could be the solution. Since you are not wearing crampons but snowshoes, they can be the semi-stiff type instead of the less flexible stiff ones. The way you walk while snowshoeing is different either way.

Make sure they fit well and wear warm socks.

The main factors to consider when selecting boots for snowshoeing are the following.

Snowshoe Leg Fit: The snowshoe must allow the proper range of movement, but the foot must keep in place while walking to avoid fatigue and injuries. Whether you plan for deep snow, the shaft is best to be high. Avoid boots that go up to the knee.

Snowshoe Stability: The boot must bind tightly with your snowshoe. Semi-stiff boots (or even stiff ones) are better than soft boots. With soft boots, the binding presses hard on the boot toe top and will get you injured fast, having you unable to walk.

Snowshoe Warmth: The snowshoe boot must keep your feet warm. The heat must be trapped inside the boot. Thus good line and insulation are crucial. You will be out in the snow, maybe for hours.

Snowshoe Waterproof Capability: Do not even attempt to go out without a waterproof boot. Even gaiters won’t do a perfect job. Such boots come with a synthetic and leather combination for the outer part, and it is best to choose one with a liner from the skin of sheep or felt for the inner part. They are less breathable, but that is not a priority while in the snow. If snow or moisture gets through, your feet will get cold fast, no matter how much you walk.

Before buying your snowshoes, choose the hiking boots to pair with them.

FAQs for Snowshoes for Women

Are there left and right snowshoes?

The trick is that the binding buckles face toward the outside of your feet. That is the practical reason, as there are no lefts and rights.

What type of clothes to wear when snowshoeing?

As you warm up fast, follow the mountain rule to dress in layers.

Do I need gaiters when snowshoeing?

Yes, you do. They keep your feet dry as lots of snow will cover your boots as you walk.

How much sinking is average with snowshoes?

Depending on the snow condition and terrain, 6 to 12 inches is considered normal, but that is not an absolute rule. You want to sink as little as possible. That is why you wear snowshoes, after all.

Do I need to be very fit to do snowshoeing?

Walking long distances in snowshoes can be demanding, even on flat terrains. Walking on snow is a good exercise and engages most of your body muscles. Thus, lots of energy is consumed, and it gets more complicated when done at high elevation. Start slowly and see how it goes. As you do it, you get in better shape.

If you liked this article about the best snowshoes for women, consider checking out our other reviews below:

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